Bernie won’t win. But we will.

 

8tgfk4HI’ve held a quiet fear throughout the Bernie Sanders campaign.  With every breathlessly excited conversation with friends who were feeling the Bern, the hope swelling in me was pulled back by that nagging fear. I was afraid of the growing hero worship of Bernie.  I worried that when faced with disappointment, with loss and uncertainty and doubt, that a whole generation of young people would become disempowered, disillusioned, disheartened and disengaged.  I was terrified that our generation would learn all the wrong lessons, learn that we were powerless in a dark and uncaring world.  But that couldn’t be further from the truth.  This generation is so powerful we’ve changed the political landscape in this country beyond what anyone could have imagined.  But when we have so much love for our leaders, sometimes we come to forget that we are leaders too.

Bernie Sanders is Gandalf.  He’s Obi Wan Kenobi.  He’s Dumbledore.  He’s an old man who’s seen some things, with the wisdom and integrity to guide a younger generation through a time of great moral crisis.  He’s a grizzled sage with the courage to speak the truth to define right from wrong in the face of a rising darkness.

But in these stories, the wise old man isn’t the one who saves the world.  Instead the world depends on the young heroes who only truly step into leadership once their mentor is lost. 

Before then, they cling to the wise old man, hoping he can fight the war, hoping he can fix things.  The elder knows this is not possible, and warns the heroes that he can’t do it for them.  But they refuse to hear it.  They’re afraid they don’t have what it takes, that the mounting forces of greed and hatred are too powerful. It’s only when the wise elder is gone (or at least seems to be) that the young heroes are faced with a choice.  They can give up and accept the world as it will be without them, accept the world happening to them.  Or they can happen to the world—they can alter the outcome of their own destiny and the destiny of everyone they love and the place they call home.

We know this story.  We’ve grown up with it our entire lives.  But somewhere along the way we forgot it.  We forgot that we were always going to face this moment.  The moment where the young feel lost, where their guide, their voice of wisdom who always seemed to know the right thing to say and do, is suddenly struck down, leaving us aimless and filled with doubt and fear.

Bernie Sanders was never going to be able to fight our battles for us.  He told us this in every speech.  He told us that the system we had to change was far more vast and complex than just who sits in the Oval Office of the White House.  That he couldn’t change it alone, that it would take all of us.

The Bernie Sanders campaign has moved so many people, from those getting involved for the first time in their lives to lifelong activists who felt this time might be different.  So many people are now experiencing a crushing wave of disillusionment wash over them, and it breaks my heart because we deserve better.  We believe in a simple idea: that we deserve a political and economic system that actually works for the people, not the wealthy and powerful.  And now we’re aware more than ever how far away that is.

But that day of disillusionment was always coming, sooner or later. 

For many it came sooner, as we saw the Bernie campaign struggle to overcome the Clintons’ longer-established relationships built in communities of color, leading to steep losses among older Black Democrats in the South and older Latino Democrats in the Southwest, losing the national popular vote and leaving the campaign’s only hope of winning a half-cocked plan to overturn the vote of the people by somehow gaining the support of the superdelegates who had been stacked against Bernie from the beginning.

In another world, the disappointment might have come later.  If Bernie won the presidency, like the dog that finally catches the car, we would likely have been left wondering what to do next.  With no real groundwork laid or resources invested into electing allies to Congress, most of his agenda would have quickly ground to a halt.

Bernie knew all along that even if we elected him, he wouldn’t be able to solve everything through the sheer power of his words and integrity and justice.  He told us over and over again that to end the concentration of wealth and power in the hands of the few it would take a revolutionary shift in our political landscape, the kind of tectonic shift that changes everything.  That kind of change takes organizing people in the streets to create political pressure that can’t be ignored, getting the right people elected in every community across the country, and building grassroots organizations that can sustain that vision and hold them accountable.

If we are disillusioned now it’s because we were suffering from too many illusions to begin with.  It was the inevitable result of this insane hero worship of Bernie that he never expected of us and never asked us for.

A movement is so much more than one person, one candidate. We often don’t realize that because we were taught bad history.  We learned in school about social movements by reading about individual charismatic leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. or Cesar Chavez, but that’s not how it actually happens.  It happens because millions of everyday people like you and me do little things in every corner of the country, and together our actions swell into an unstoppable tide.

Bernie Sanders didn’t start this movement and his defeat (yes–we can say it–defeat) sure as hell won’t end it. 

There are people in this world who are just out there being themselves and somehow one day they end up in the right place at the right time, when the world needs someone like them.  That’s Bernie.  He’s been fighting greed and bigotry his whole life from his corner of the world in Vermont, and decided to run a campaign for president if only just to show that there was an alternative, to push Hillary Clinton, to force a real debate on inequality.  No one predicted, including him, that our generation would put that campaign in the history books.

The media barely covered it as a joke, DC insiders rolled their eyes.  Yet suddenly thousands of young people were showing up to his rallies, he was raising money to rival the super PACs through countless small donors from every part of the country, word was spreading through social media and he was rapidly climbing in the polls, running neck and neck with Clinton.

But Bernie didn’t start this.  He wasn’t just some overnight success.  Bernie tapped into something that had been bubbling for years since the financial crash.  Perhaps we first glimpsed it in 2011, when tens of thousands of students and teachers and workers occupied the capitol building in Madison, Wisconsin to protest Governor Walker, the first glimmer that the anti-austerity protests sweeping Europe in the aftermath of the financial meltdown might also have life here in the United States.  Later that year it exploded into the Occupy Wall Street protests that rocked nearly every major city in the nation and completely shifted the political debate.  Although the Occupy encampments dissolved, the huge shift in U.S. politics on the issue of economic inequality translated into real policy gains, most notably the dazzling string of victories raising the minimum wage in cities and states, at a scale that would have been unthinkable if not laughable just a couple years ago.  Bill de Blasio being elected mayor of New York, Elizabeth Warren elected Senator from Massachusetts, these were waves in the same political tide.

So although no one inside the DC beltway thought it was possible, Bernie Fucking Sanders actually gave Hillary Fucking Clinton a run for her money she’ll never forget.  Yeah, Bernie Sanders, that Jewish democratic socialist congressman from the middle of nowhere.  And Hillary Clinton, whose candidacy seemed so completely inevitable that no serious candidate wanted to run against her.  If you told any DC insider two years ago that Bernie Sanders would win half the states in the country over Clinton, they would have laughed in your face.  And they’ll continue to laugh when we tell them that this movement is still burning, that it’s only going to continue to grow, that the young and restless are coming for them.  But based on the accuracy of all their predictions lately, the political analysts on TV don’t know shit.

The vast majority of voters under the age of 40, in every demographic, in every region of the country, chose Sanders.  Sanders won young people by an even more astronomical margin than Obama did in 2008.  The ideas and values of social democracy won our generation, not some young charismatic candidate or some rebellion against the disaster of the Bush years.  The ideas of universal healthcare and higher education, of reigning in Wall Street and the fossil fuel industry, of guaranteeing a living wage, of making the wealthy pay their fair share, of getting corporate money out of politics.  Regardless of who wins in 2016, the future of American politics, of American history, is our generation.

The change we need won’t come on Election Day.  It was never going to.  It will only happen if we organize, at a much deeper level than a campaign for one presidential candidate. 

The change we need will happen when we build organizations with lasting power, from the ground up, in communities across the country.  We need to build grassroots organizations that have the capacity to mass mobilize voters like the Working Families Party in New York, or California Calls in California.  We need a re-energized labor movement pushing bold initiatives like Fight for 15 or the Black Friday strikes at WalMart.  We need Dreamers and Black Lives Matter activists marching in the streets.  We need a better Democratic Party in every county, in every state, that’s accountable to us and not to corporate interests.

We need organizations willing to truly challenge corporate power and change the game.  These organizations will look differently in different communities. Just as Bernie’s platform and message were honed to perfection over a lifetime of representing folks in rural New England, an organized force to address inequality in the Southwest must put the exploitation of immigrant workers front and center, in the South must confront the legacy of slavery and entrenched racial inequality, in the Midwest must work to rebuild communities devastated by globalization.

Here’s what the political revolution looks like for me:  My community stretches up the Central Coast of California, where the agriculture and oil industries once dominated local politics, where developers are salivating over land to grab for cheap and sell for more, where demographic change from immigration has led to racial tension, but also the beginning of a progressive majority.  Here, we’re fighting oil and gas companies to stop new drilling and power plants being built in our communities.  We’re struggling with the agriculture industry to win better labor conditions for farmworkers and protections from toxic pesticides around our schools.  We’re going head to head with real estate developers to keep our communities affordable for the working-class that’s lived here for generations.

So what can you do in your own community?

  • Get involved in a local organization in your city, or start a new one, that will bring together regular working people to demand our local elected officials are accountable to us, not big corporations.
  • Organize your coworkers to start a union and together have real bargaining power to demand better treatment, better wages and benefits, and a voice in the workplace.
  • Organize the tenants in your apartment building to stop rent increases and evictions and force your landlord to repair the rundown building.
  • Join other progressives to take charge of your county’s Democratic central committee and make sure your local party pushes for candidates willing to take on corporate interests to stand up for our people and our planet.
  • Run for your city council or support a candidate who will fight landlords and developers for affordable housing and tenants’ rights, raise the minimum wage and pass laws raising standards for local workers, stop companies from building polluting projects or extracting fossil fuels in your community, shift the city’s budget from police to community services promoting health and education, and cap donations to local political campaigns to keep out big corporate money.

The political revolution in my community won’t look the same as the political revolution in yours.  But wherever you are, whatever you do, bring people together into something that will last, challenge the people holding all the money who think they hold all the power, and win real victories that matter to real people.

You won’t have to do it alone.  There are countless people just like you who believe in a better world.  You just have to find them.  Luckily, you might already know a few.

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One comment

  1. Sherry Blair

    Thank you Lucas. You are right about all of this. And one more thing: stay young at heart, don’t let the hard times harden your heart. Remember that old folks were young like you too, but only a few stayed young at heart like Bernie. Take it from an old woman.

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