In Defense of Optimism: How I Became Disillusioned with Disillusionment

martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x1This blog gets its name from a famous Martin Luther King Jr. quote:  “We shall overcome because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Today I’m thinking about the hope and faith held by Dr. King and the importance of optimism.

I read a great story about King today:

Harry Belafonte tells a story in his amazing memoir, ‘My Song,’ about King being challenged by his SCLC deputies on his accelerating radicalism generally, and the Poor People’s Campaign specifically, just a week before he died…  Belafonte quotes King telling the group, gathered at the singer/actor/activist’s New York apartment: ‘What deeply troubles me now is that for all the steps we’ve taken toward integration, I’ve come to believe that we are integrating into a burning house.’  When Belafonte asks what that means they should do, an exhausted King tells him:   ‘I guess we’re just going to have to become firemen.’

This is the kind of optimism that looks with wide open eyes at the reality of the world and decides not to dismiss it and withdraw from it, but to engage it and reshape it.  King realizes he is fighting to be part of an America plagued by poverty and war.  But he not only believes that marginalized people can be included in this society, but puts them in the role of heroes: those who through their liberation and inclusion can lead the movements needed to heal it.

Many activists are cynical people.  It’s hard not to be, organizing reluctant people to fight uphill battles against a powerful status quo.  Anger is an important motivator.  But people are never truly called to action without that seemingly-impossible combination of anger and hope: An understanding of the world as it is, and a deep belief in a vision of the world as it should be.

In fact, optimism itself is fundamentally necessary to the spread of a worldview that supports progressive change.

Conservatism is deeply dependent on pessimism.  The foundation of the right-wing narrative is pessimism: basically those promiscuous gay birth-control-using kids these days and all those dangerous criminal brown and black people are taking over America, crumbling its moral foundation and taking all our tax money to spend on drugs.  Therefore, beef up the prisons and the military, dig your heels in on traditional practices, and slash the social safety net.  The fact that most people believe teen birth rates, drug use, and violent crime are rising right now when they’re actually all plummeting in the US is a testament to the power of conservative fear messaging.  Every time you spread the idea that this country is going to shit, a Republican gets elected somewhere.

I was raised with pretty cynical politics.  For most of my life I believed that America was irredeemably racist, materialistic and violent.  My political consciousness developed largely through 3 national moments: The dismantling of civil liberties in the early 2000’s and horrifying start of the Iraq War, the failed push for immigration reform in 2006 when I started watching cable news and was stunned by the swell of public hatred towards immigrant families, and the financial crash in 2008 and following years of heartless austerity as I worked to get a public education in a system that was crumbling around me.  Disillusionment came easy.

It took me actually doing work to make me disillusioned with disillusionment.  I worked on campaigns that beat bank lobbyists to pass legislation raising tens of billions of dollars in federal student aid and defeated big oil at the ballot box in California.  I stood behind Nancy Pelosi at her press conference in San Francisco to announce the passage of historic health care reform.  I helped organize Oakland residents to force big developers to guarantee thousands of living-wage local-hire jobs targeted at those who needed them most.  I turned out the vote to raise enough revenue to finally balance California’s budget so the youth I work with today are dealing with how to restore budget cuts in their schools, not how to make them.

And sure, I was a very small part of each of these victories and I know they each would have happened without me.  But not without a lot of people like me.  The real transformation was not the impact I had on this work, but the impact this work had on me.  It made me see myself not as someone passively affected by the conditions of the world around me, but as an agent of change.  It made me believe in the power of people like me, young people and people of color, to be neither the villains nor the victims in the story of my country, but the heroes.  I began to believe in a different story, one that ended happy.

I deeply believe that the forces of peace and equality and enlightenment throughout history tend to win in the end.  I’ll admit I’m going on faith and a loose grasp of history given to me by what’s left of California’s public education system.  But I believe victory in the battles we fight today will one day feel just as inevitable as the battles fought by Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King.

Practicing optimism is not just about motivating yourself or feeling happy.  It’s about changing the dominant narrative about our world.  It’s about telling stories of hope where we are the good guys and we win.

So the next time you see some corny Upworthy link that says “This 3 minute video will restore your faith in humanity” maybe you should watch it.  We could all use our faith in humanity restored sometimes.

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2 comments

  1. dcvianc

    Thank you for this excellent entry. This generation, our generation, doesn’t have the privilege and luxury previous generations had and we cannot afford to be pessimistic and especially apathetic.

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