Playing the Inside Game as an Outsider

HCAN-Lower-Senate-Park

 

This week I read two of the most interesting articles I’ve seen in a while.  The first is an interview with the founder of Health Care for America Now (HCAN), the alliance of major organizations created to pass healthcare reform, easily the biggest public policy change in a generation, which closed its doors at the end of 2013.  The second is a profile of the Working Families Party (WFP), which many credit with the surprise victory of Bill de Blasio, the populist mayor-elect of New York, who ran on a message of fighting economic inequality and is seen as a symbol of a new era in America’s largest city.  You should really read them both yourself, it’s hard for me to do them justice.  But both pieces made me reflect on the idea of “the inside game” and “the outside game” in politics

Some activists believe only in the inside game (lobbying, legislative analysis, running for office), while some believe only in the outside game (organizing, protesting, moving the public through mass communications).  Like many others, I believe social change is only possible with a combination of both.

But more importantly, I believe that it must be the same people, the same organizations, at the same time, that play both the inside game and the outside game.  We cannot be content to have some people within our movements doing electoral politics and others doing grassroots organizing.  The inside players will become out of touch and unaccountable to the grassroots, while the outside players will become marginalized, ineffective and powerless.  We have to build organizations that can play the inside game as outsiders.  Organizations that engage with the Democratic Party and have the weight to sway elections, but that maintain independence and don’t take marching orders from Democratic elected officials.

From the profile on the WFP:

“Like many who came out of the 1960s left, Cantor came to realize that community organizing and movement building were both indispensable and insufficient to win lasting change. He still identifies with those movements, but his distinctive aptitude has been to find ways in which the electoral process can advance progressive goals. “I feel we’re in a long line of people going back to the abolitionists: the populists, the suffragists, the labor activists, the civil-rights workers,” he says. “These were all extra-parliamentary movements. We strive to be like them, and we recognize we have to contest for these values through the state, through elections. That’s what most people think politics is. That’s our role.”

But of course elections don’t lead movements, movements precede elections.  HCAN began building the momentum for healthcare reform in 2007, while the presidential election was over a year away.  They managed to bring all the Democratic candidates together around roughly the same healthcare plan.  Edwards’, Clinton’s, and Obama’s policy proposals on healthcare were surprisingly similar, and this was no accident.  Even the differences between candidates disappeared once it came to actually passing the law (Obama opposed the individual mandate as a candidate, but ended up adopting it and fighting for it as president).

However, when movements and elections are timed well, they provide a point of access for millions who would never otherwise participate in movement-building activities like attending rallies.  An electoral win becomes a symbolic moment, a turning point that gives people the feeling of an inevitable tide turning.  Bill de Blasio’s stunning election in New York City may have been the first time average people felt like the momentum created by the Occupy movement had led to a real victory.  After 15 years of building the infrastructure to win progressive victories at the ballot box outside of the Democratic Party establishment, the WFP was perfectly positioned as public outrage over economic inequality had finally begun to take hold.

The hard part is that movements depend on perfect timing.  Movements must be sustained by organizations, but it’s immensely difficult to start a new organization in time to capture a movement’s moment of opportunity (at least an organization of the size necessary to have real power).  So perhaps the most effective large-scale movement-building organizations are those like HCAN and the WFP, which emerge by bringing together coalitions of existing community groups and labor unions in order to scale up rapidly.  These organizations had membership bases, relationships with key local players, experienced staff, and a fundraising machine before they even launched.

Yet simply getting all the key players in the same room is not nearly enough.  Some of the biggest failings in the campaign for health care reform (loss of the public option, inadequate subsidies to make insurance plans affordable) came from the Obama administration dismissing the value of the outside game.  Despite Obama’s community organizing background and his team’s talking the talk about everyday citizens getting involved, in practice the administration has taken a very insular, inside game approach to governing.  With HCAN taking a subdued approach and all the outside game action coming from the Tea Party, there was virtually no pressure on the left to hold firm to the principles of healthcare reform.

From the profile on HCAN:

“This was a huge misunderstanding by the Obama folks about power and political dynamics, just a fundamental miscalculation and blindness that was really destructive.  The president’s personality is to be conciliatory. Until the summer of 2011 and the grand bargain collapsed, he always wanted to be conciliatory. He also had people like Rahm Emanuel and Jim Messina in the White House who wanted to totally control everything and did not want any on the left pushing them. But power works differently. They would have been in a much stronger position if they could say, “We’re being pushed really, really, really hard from the left, and so this is the best we can do.”  And then cut final deals when they had to.”

Without the outside game holding a hard line, those playing the inside game are impossibly weak in negotiations.  But being an ideologically pure and independent outsider is not enough either.  Frederick Douglass famously said “power concedes nothing without a demand”.  Yet too often our lists of demands are empty noise shouted from outside the building, barely heard by smirking suits inside the halls of power.  Demands are only demands when they come with credible threats to their targets.  One of the most credible threats is an electoral machine that actually has the capacity to end the career of a politician that crosses it.  That was the source of the Tea Party’s power, and is similarly the source of the WFP’s power.

Maybe the biggest lesson from these two stories is that our work is never done.  A few weeks ago, Health Care for America Now closed its doors, declaring its mission accomplished.  Of course it’s difficult to keep a coalition together after the campaign that created it is won.  But even with the Affordable Care Act, the US healthcare system will likely continue to lag behind most industrialized nations in affordability, access and quality.  If the Working Families Party had gone home satisfied after their signature victory of ending New York’s harsh drug sentencing laws in 2004, they would have never made it to their golden opportunity last year in the aftermath of Occupy.  But this speaks to the fundamental difference between the WFP and HCAN: The WFP grew from a vision of an organization, not a vision of a campaign.  An organization that can play the inside game and win a seat at the table of power while maintaining its independence and values through an authentic grassroots base on the outside.

We don’t need more inside game organizations or more outside game organizations.  What we need are organizations that can do both, that can stand on power and on principle.

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