Ideology is Mostly Bullshit: Why the GOP is Outraged by Obama’s $716 Billion “Cut” from Medicare

I recently had a discussion about the weirdness of Romney blasting Obama in the debates for cutting $716 billion from Medicare.  Aren’t Republicans all about cutting spending?  Medicare is about as close as the US government gets to socialism and its creation was vehemently opposed by Republicans in the 1960’s.  And the Medicare Advantage program, where Obamacare makes that $716 billion cut from, is widely acknowledged as a wasteful failed program, the kind of thing conservatives are always talking about cutting.

So is it simply that Mitt Romney will literally say anything to make Barack Obama look bad?

I think there’s a deeper explanation:  Political ideology is mostly bullshit.

Very few political actions are actually motivated by a sweeping ideology about something abstract like the appropriate size of government.  Politics is really about winning power battles to serve the interests of different groups of people.

In this case, the key fact is that suburban white retirees are an important constituency of the Republican Party.  They have no particular interest in limited government, but they’re a foundation of the conservative coalition because they tend to be relatively wealthy and less government usually means they get to pay less taxes.  It would be political suicide for the GOP to propose cutting their Medicare benefits, even though it fits with their ideological principle of smaller government.  That’s because suburban white retirees don’t want limited government when it applies to them.  That’s why Paul Ryan only proposes cutting Medicare benefits for everyone under the age of 55.  And it’s also why conservatives can feign outrage when Obama “cuts” Medicare—not because it violates their heartfelt values—but because it’s something they can organize a political coalition around.

In fact, conservatives are for big government in a lot of situations, as long as it doesn’t affect the constituencies that make up their coalition:

  • They’re down with big government all up in a woman’s uterus
  • They like big government profiling Muslims at the airport
  • They’re cool with big government stopping and frisking black teenagers on the street
  • They love big government telling gay people who they can’t marry
  • They’re all about big government asking random Latinos for their immigration papers

The disguise of political ideology is exposed at the local level, where politics gets batshit crazy.  Take this recent incident in my city:  Residents of the affluent conservative east side opposed the construction of a new apartment complex.  Over 50 people, self-organized as far as I can tell, stayed at a hearing for four hours waiting to speak.  Listen to their frothing-at-the-mouth-anger:

“I’m in shock,” resident Christopher Fries said. “We’re not going to give up. We’re going to file a lawsuit.”

“You’re not getting our vote,” yelled Nadia Emen, who earlier had said she got married Saturday and cut the festivities short to speak out against the project at the hearing.

Now you might be thinking:  “Wait a minute…  Wouldn’t a city planning commission blocking a developer from freely buying private property and building whatever type of business enterprise they chose be an intrusion of big government on the liberty of job creators and whatnot?”

But these folks don’t really care about small government.  They care about their own group interests.  And in this case, they are a bunch of suburbanites who really really really don’t like the idea of poor people living near them.

Although ideology is mostly bullshit, I don’t think this is a bad thing.

I’m progressive, but I don’t like big government for its own sake.  I had a high school American history teacher who talked a lot about the legacies of Jefferson and Hamilton.  I consider myself a Jeffersonian even though Jefferson hated the growth of the federal government.  But back then, government was funded by a regressive tax system whose burden fell on the 99%—the rural farmers—and was mostly used to benefit wealthy urban manufacturing elites.  If I lived in Jefferson’s time I would have been against big government too, because what I really care about is using politics to serve the interests of struggling working-class people.

I just wish we could be a little more honest and stop pretending we give a shit about philosophy.

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